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Jordan Online Casinos

JordanSituated at a point that serves as a gateway to Africa, Europe, and Asia, The Kingdom of Jordan has long been one of the most important nations in the Middle East. Unlike some of its neighbors, the country is one of the most popular destinations for Westerners who are visiting the region: it is considered a very safe place to travel and live, and has generally held positive diplomatic relations both with its neighbors and with the majority of the world at large.

While the Jordanian government is ruled by a king, it is not as autocratic or theocratic as many of the other nations in this region, and that has showed itself in the willingness to consider allowing gambling in various forms to exist within its borders. However, this has fallen short of an acceptance of full casino gambling, and the nation is also far from regulating or legalizing online betting sites – though there are many online casinos in Jordan and many of our residents enjoy playing on them.

The best online gambling sites that accept Jordanians are listed below. While these are mostly for playing casino games for real money, they also allow for betting on sports as well as online poker, keno and a number of other games too.

Top Casino Sites in Jordan 2017

  • Rank
  • Casino
  • Bonus
  • Play
1
100% UP TO $1000
2
200% UP TO $1500
3
100% UP TO $3200

Top Casino Sites in Jordan 2017

1
Spin Palace Casino
100% UP TO $1000
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2
888 Casino
200% UP TO $1500
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3
Casino.com
100% UP TO $3200
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Welfare Lottery Allowed, but Resorts Fail to Emerge

It is common for people to assume that Islamic nations such as Jordan will automatically ban all forms of gambling, adhering to a strict interpretation of religious law. However, the customs of Muslim countries vary significantly in this regard, and in this case, there is not a total ban on the practice, even if you won’t find any incredible resort cities like Las Vegas here.

One of the more popular ways to gamble in Jordan is through the national lottery. The Jordanian Welfare Lottery is rather popular, offering large prizes to winners and with all profits going towards programs that benefit the poor and others in need. Another option is bingo, which is a surprisingly popular pastime in the city of Amman. Similar to the lottery, many charitable groups run bingo games in order to raise money, often accompanied by live music or other social events.

But this falls far short of the kinds of full scale gambling found in other parts of the world. There is good reason for this: while the above activities have been permitted, betting is still considered illegal by and large under Jordanian law. However, this country isn’t one that always imposes Islamic traditions across the board, and while you won’t find any casinos in Jordan, it wasn’t long ago that there was serious discussion about bringing a resort to the kingdom.

Beginning in 2003, prominent lawmakers began to push for the idea of a casino in the country, suggesting that it could potentially bring in significant revenues for the government. In 2007, bids from at least three different companies were considered, with government officials (allegedly including Prime Minister Marouf al-Bakhit) eventually approving the proposal of a group known as Oasis Holding Investment.

However, that deal was fraught with issues, not the least of which was that the country’s Justice Minister pointed out that it would violate Jordanian law. The casino was never built, as the government eventually canceled the contract with Oasis, and the entire affair became something of a scandal for many major officials. It appeared as though while the general population wasn’t against the idea of a casino (many Jordanians do travel abroad to gamble), the process was seen as corrupt and lacking in transparency, killing any support it may have had.

Online Sites Unauthorized

As we’ve said, while some gambling activity is tolerated in Jordan, the nation is far from a haven for bettors, with most forms still considered illegal. That’s never a good sign for Internet gaming sites, and as you would expect, online gambling in Jordan is not approved or regulated by the local government.

That’s not to say that people here are not placing bets over the web. As we mentioned above, many citizens travel abroad to visit resorts and play their favorite casino games, so there’s no doubt that some of them also stay at home and gamble online on their computers and mobile devices. While the government may not be in favor of Internet gaming sites, they don’t actively block them, either, and there has been no indication that players are at any risk of legal action for participating in real money games.

Add that all up, and you have a situation where many online casinos are happy to accept players in Jordan. You’ll generally see the same range of developers and operators represented here as you would in any other unregulated country. A few of the more prominent software providers that power our online gambling sites include:

  • Realtime Gaming
  • Microgaming
  • Betsoft
  • NetEnt
  • Topgame
  • Play’n GO

Casino Licensing Still on the Table

Jordan has several conflicting factors pulling it in different directions when it comes to the possibility of resort gaming ever taking hold here. Being an Islamic nation works against the idea; a tradition of relative religious freedom and openness offers a counter to that. Yet the idea is still against the law, at least for now; some powerful government officials see gambling as a possible route for improving the economy and bringing in new revenues.

The long and short of it is that debates over whether to build resorts in the country aren’t likely to end anytime soon, as there are strong reasons for people on both sides of the issue to cling to their positions. Sure enough, the prospect has been brought up yet again by the Deputy Prime Minister, who suggested in February 2016 that tourist destinations such as Aqaba and Petra would be perfect locations for issuing casino licenses. The move could be a response to a similar proposal across the Gulf of Aqaba in Israel, where – similar to in Jordan – religious conservatives are battling with officials who see the potential for new revenues to be generated.

It is unclear as to whether this attempt to float the idea has any better chance of success than previous efforts, nor if lawmakers in general are ready to change anti-gambling laws to allow for such a facility. The latest proposal does have a couple of advantages: it has been far more transparent than those in the last decade, and the officials pushing the plan have made it clear that only foreigners would be allowed to gamble at the resorts, with Iranian tourists being the most targeted market. But it remains to be seen if any proposal can overcome the ill will that was caused by the scandals of the past decade, not to mention the general opposition to gambling that you would find in any Islamic nation.

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