Detroit Gambler Sues BetMGM for Denying Her $3m in Online Roulette Winnings

  • The betting giant has reportedly cited a game glitch as the reason for not paying up
  • Jacqueline Davis played the fixed-odds Luck o’ the Roulette online game for five days straight
  • She claims she started with just $50 on March 18 and spun it into $3m by the time she stopped
  • Her attorney posits how many people lost money on the BetMGM game, and if they got it back
  • BetMGM allegedly said Davis could keep the $100,000 if she keeps quiet about the glitch
Game Over words in green on black screen
A Detroit woman who played a BetMGM online roulette game for five days straight is suing the company for not honoring her $3m win. [Image: Shutterstock.com]

Davis could only cash out $100,000

A Detroit woman is suing BetMGM after she could only cash out $100,000 of her total $3m online roulette win. Fox 2 Detroit reported on June 22 that Jacqueline Davis is now “betting on a lawsuit to get her winnings.”

The news station took to Twitter on Wednesday to quote Davis as saying that BetMGM won’t pay out because of a “glitch” in its online Luck o’ the Roulette game:

Davis, a gambler who recently got hooked on iGaming, allegedly played the fixed-odds game for five days straight starting March 18. When Davis finally quit her marathon play while ahead, she had spun $50 into $3m.

The TV network reports that Davis’s lawsuit claims that the MGM Grand in Detroit gave her a $100,000 cash advance on her winnings at the end of March. When she returned to the property the following day for more money, MGM refused to comply “claiming there was a glitch in the game” and that no more money would be forthcoming.

Life-changing win on hold?

Over her epic five-day online roulette session, Davis was reportedly up and down over $11m before she settled on $3m. BetMGM and other online games require regular 24/7 checking by operators for “mistakes” to correct the games if they’re “not right”, Fox 2 Detroit reported. If the games are not right, and a player could figure it out, then that player deserves to win.

Asked if she might have known that “the game was broken” during Wednesday’s interview, Davis replied: “How could I?” “Because you were winning,” the news reporter offered, to which Davis fired back:

The purpose of gambling is to win.”

Davis’s lawyer, David Steingold, has gotten a vice-like grip on the glitch angle. He said the onus is on the New Jersey-based iGaming and sports betting giant to check its games “every single night, every 24 hours.”

What’s more, Steingold is asking questions such as how many people lost money, if they got their money back, and how much BetMGM makes on Luck o’ the Roulette.

A settlement of sorts

According to her attorney, BetMGM offered Davis a settlement in which she gets to keep the $100,000 if she signs an agreement to keep quiet about the glitch. If news of the glitch ever got out, Fox 2 reports, Davis would have to “return the money plus pay BetMGM’s costs.”

The news service reporter said he called the BetMGM attorney for a comment, only to be hung up on.

This is not the first time an alleged mistake has painted BetMGM in an unflattering light. In late April this year, the firm confirmed it paid customers $10,500 in winnings after they took advantage of a typo in a January NFL prop bet line.

The bet was whether the Kansas City Chiefs’ Patrick Mahomes and the Cleveland Browns’ Baker Mayfield would throw for 300 or more yards in the January game. But, instead of entering “300”, a BetMGM employee keyed in “00”. Nine wide-awake bettors jumped on the no-brainer automatic win before BetMGM took it down.