BetMGM Loses $10,000 Because of an NFL Betting Line Typo

  • BetMGM was also fined $500 by the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement
  • A 300-passing yard NFL prop bet from January was missing the “3”
  • Nine customers jumped on the automatic win before BetMGM took it down
  • BetMGM decided to pay the winnings before an investigation
  • The operator was able to void bets on Korea and China baseball “past-post” bets last summer
Monopoly Community Chest bank error card
BetMGM confirmed this week that it paid customers $10,500 in winnings after they took advantage of a short-lived typo in an NFL prop bet line. [Image: Shutterstock.com]

$10,500 missing digit

BetMGM is out over five figures after a typo in a January NFL betting line allowed a few bettors to take advantage of a too-good-to-be-true opportunity. On top of that, the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement (DGE) fined the gambling operator $500 for “the failure to properly display a market in violation of a Division requirement.”

the market ended up as whether or not the two players would pass for at least “00” yards

The football game was an AFC matchup between the Cleveland Browns and the defending Super Bowl Champs, the Kansas City Chiefs. The bet in question was a player prop bet having to do with the team’s respective starting quarterbacks, Baker Mayfield and Patrick Mahomes. What BetMGM intended to offer was a bet on whether or not both quarterbacks would throw for 300 or more yards in the game. Instead, the person who entered it into the system forgot the lead digit, so the market ended up as whether or not the two players would pass for at least “00” yards.

As often happens, the error was spotted quickly and corrected, but not before some customers found it. Five BetMGM bettors and four Borgata Online customers put money on the zero yards prop bet and profited to the tune of $10,500.

BetMGM didn’t wait for an investigation

Sportsbooks almost always have clauses in their terms and conditions which say that they have the right to cancel bets if they are clearly posted in error. Such mistakes are called “palpable errors” or “palps.” BetMGM reported the issue to New Jersey regulators and asked permission to void the bets, since there was no question the operator did not intend to post such a ridiculous prop bet, but the DGE required BetMGM to wait until after an investigation.

a small price to pay for the goodwill

Rather than waiting for the DGE to render a verdict, BetMGM simply opted to make the customers’ days and pay off the winning bets. The company confirmed this week that it paid. Though $10,500 is a lot of money to most people, it is chump change to a major sportsbook, so it was likely a small price to pay for the goodwill.

As the Associated Press pointed out, one of BetMGM’s most popular promotions is ironically its “no-brainer” bet. Only available for new customers, BetMGM will offer a $1 wager that pays out $100 if something that is all but a 100% lock happens. For example, prior to this month’s The Masters golf tournament, the “no-brainer” was to risk $1 and if any golfer hit a birdie, the customer won $100.

BetMGM did void bets last summer

Last summer, BetMGM was able to save money by voiding bets on what would have been a $200,000 mistake. With most sports on pause in the United States because of the COVID-19 pandemic, bettors turned to Korean and Chinese baseball for their betting needs.

BetMGM offered many different bets on KBO League and Chinese Professional Baseball League (CPBL) games that started between 1am and 2am Pacific time. The operator, however, inadvertently left a number of wagers open well past the games’ start times one night, allowing bettors to make lucrative parlay bets on games which were already half-over. Not all of the bets were guaranteed to win, but the “past-posting” provided customers with a massive advantage.

Approximately 50 bets were placed at the self-serve kiosks at the Bellagio and on BetMGM’s mobile app. One of the bets was $250 on a ten-leg parlay that won $137,000.

After an investigation, the Nevada Gaming Control Board (NGCB) ruled in favor of the operator, allowing BetMGM to void that night’s tickets.