Bingo Addict Murdered Uncle for £300, Lady Killers Documentary Reveals

  • Susan Warne pushed her uncle down the stairs before strangling and stabbing him
  • She had tried to rob a 90-year old woman just a few days before the murder
  • Previously of good character, Warne became addicted after giving up her job due to injury
bingo card
Susan Warne pushed her 80-year-old uncle down the stairs and stabbed him to his death after stealing £300 to fund her bingo addiction. [Image: Shutterstock.com]

Selfie video revealed all

Bingo addict Susan Warne murdered her uncle and went on to film her confession in a selfie video, a new documentary has revealed.

pushed John Proctor, 80, down the stairs to steal £300 from his wallet before stabbing him in the neck

The Lady Killers documentary for Quest Red TV tells how in June 2015, the 41-year-old from the UK pushed John Proctor, 80, down the stairs to steal £300 ($391.62) from his wallet before stabbing him in the neck with a knife to silence him.

Just hours after his death, she was caught spending the cash on slot machines in a seaside arcade.

Warne attempted robbery before killing uncle

Three days before the attack on her uncle, Warne had tried to rob a 90-year-old woman to fund her gambling addiction.

On the day of the murder, Warne lied to Proctor, saying her husband had thrown her out. Her uncle agreed that she could move in with him. While he was showing her an upstairs bedroom, his niece pushed him down the stairs. Proctor sustained broken bones and a fractured arm as a result.

Warne then strangled him and stabbed him twice in the throat, leaving him to die. She quickly deposited the money she had stolen from his wallet into her account and went to a nearby gambling amusement arcade.

Before being arrested by police, Warne had made a suicide attempt. She was found by a passer-by who handed her over to the authorities.

Police tell their story

In The Lady Killers documentary for Quest Red TV, former police detectives outlined Warne’s case, including her continued denial of the crime.

The murderer was soon caught out when detectives gained access to her phone. In a video selfie she shot shortly after the crime, Warne apologized for her actions, saying “I’m sorry, I didn’t mean for it to happen.”

She will serve a minimum of 20 years

Once the police went on to show her the video, Warne replied “Yes, I can’t take it anymore; I need to tell the truth,” and proceeded to make a full confession.

After pleading guilty to murder, Warne was sentenced to life in prison. She will serve a minimum of 20 years.

Bingo addiction developed after injury

Previously of good character, Warne was both a wife and a mother who ran a successful landscaping business. After an injury, however, she was forced to give up her business. She started gambling, mainly on bingo, and her debts began to build up.

In the documentary, gambling therapist Liz Karter said the loss of Warne’s job would have caused “a huge loss of identity, loss of self-esteem.”